That time when the Buddha said he didn’t want us to sing and dance

Picture of the old man himself, a selfie, taken early Sunday morning after an evening of singing and dancing the night away he instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players discuss what the deal is with Asian Buddhists calling out the speech of other Buddhists online, which apparently is a thing on the Internet

The old man just received a tweet from someone in Surabaya, East Java, a Buddhist presumably, with some bug up his ass.

Quelle mouche t’a piqué?

The old man talks to himself in French.

Sally replies.

“It’s a method he uses to watch his emotions as they arise in his mind.

Caroline replies.

“Married life, living with someone can be stressful.”

Caroline adds.

“Which explains why he is always speaking to Babs in French.”

Allez, allez ma petite cochon.

Jonathan replies.

“I recently had a friend visiting from Paris.”

Jonathan continues.

“We went for coffee together at the Julius Meinl in Lincoln Village.”

Jonathan adds, returning to the subject at hand.

“My visitor from France was amused by their papotage.”

Allen replies.

“The Internet can be weird like that, people you would rather not talk to talking at you.”

This is hearsay for Allen, his crib is full of paper.

Allen adds.

“I can only imagine.”

Sally replies.

“What time is it in East Java anyway?”

Allen replies.

“Ask your phone.”

Pause.

“It keeps giving me the time for East Chicago.”

Allen replies.

“Is there even an East Chicago?.”

Allen adds.

“East of downtown is Lake Michigan.”

Once a New Yorker, always a New Yorker.

Anyway.

There’s this person, a Buddhist that has a bone to pick with the old man.

Tabarnak.

Google it.

Caroline replies.

“Say what you will about the Internet.”

Caroline adds.

“It’s a great place to practice patience.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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