It sure takes a lot of Zen to be a Tibetan Buddhist on the Internet…

Picture of Trungpa chilling with his people, us, back in the day the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players discuss the response to their poking their noses into the business of our so-called living Buddhas, the Rinpoches mentioned here, as it pertains to the death of Jamgon Kongtrul Rinpoche…

Virginia begins.

“Tension city.”

Karl replies.

“You’re quoting George Bush?”

Virginia pauses.

“The first one.”

Virginia continues.

“The Bush that was president in 1992 when Jamgon Kongtrul died.”

Karl replies.

“That is how 41 described his debates with Bill Clinton.”

Virginia replies.

“I was actually thinking of Dana Carvey playing George Bush.”

Caroline replies.

“Camp KTD is not happy.”

Virginia replies.

“We don’t talk about it.”

Karl replies.

“They prefer to anonymously vent here in the comments section.”

Sally replies.

“Does that work?”

Caroline replies.

“They’ve tried it before.”

Caroline continues.

“Without success, obviously.”

Sally replies.

“What do they want?”

Virginia replies.

“They don’t want anyone to talk about how Jamgon Kongtrul died.”

Virginia pauses.

“It’s none of our business.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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6 Comments

Filed under Buddhism

6 responses to “It sure takes a lot of Zen to be a Tibetan Buddhist on the Internet…

  1. They succeeded in making Tinfoil Ushnisha NSFW.

    • Caroline replies.

      “At least for those readers that receive notifications whenever a comment is posted here.”

      Jonathan replies.

      “You probably shouldn’t be surfing the internet at work anyway.”

      Virginia replies.

      “Good point.”

      Sally replies.

      “I do.”

      Virginia replies.

      “Are you ever not online.”

      Sally replies.

      “Do you ever not breath?”

      Jonathan adds.

      “It’s not like you ever worked.”

      Jonathan adds.

      “For an employer who cares about what you do with your time.”

      Sally replies.

      “Welcome to the future of employment.”

      Virginia replies.

      “So much for job security.”

      Sally replies.

      “What’s that?”

  2. Blinde Schildpad

    Blinde Schildpad shakes his head, not even trying to wipe the cooky crumbs from his beard as he’s reading the comments on some certain recent posts on the Old Man’s soap box.

    “Methinks the Lama doth protest too much.”

    • Allen replies.

      “It isn’t as easy as it looks to reply to comments in character.”

      Jonathan replies.

      “Not that the effort isn’t appreciated.”

      Allen replies.

      “There is a method to this form.”

      Jonathan replies.

      “We are using Elmore Leonard as our guide.”

      Allen replies.

      “Keep it simple.”

      Jonathan adds.

      “Let the dialogue speak for itself.”

      Allen replies.

      “The bit about the beard and the cookie crumbs.”

      Jonathan adds.

      “That isn’t Elmore Leonard.”

      Allen replies.

      “Does the reader need this information?”

      Jonathan adds.

      “Nope.”

      Allen adds.

      “Less is more.”

      Jonathan adds.

      “That’s the ticket.”

    • Caroline replies.

      “Thank you lama Wangchen.”

      Karl replies.

      “Where does Rinpoche find these losers.”

      Virginia replies.

      “We don’t know if this person is a lama or not.”

      Caroline replies.

      “It makes no difference.”

      Caroline continues.

      “It’s a learned behavior consistent with that of a lama.”

      Sally replies.

      “Every lama I’ve ever met thinks as Lama Wangchen.”

      Virginia replies.

      “I wasn’t aware that you could read minds.”

      Caroline replies.

      “If the shoe fits, wear it.”

      Caroline concludes.

      “It’s perfectly consistent of the rhetoric coming out of Karme ling for decades.

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