Chogyam Trungpa on not getting stuck on the path to enlightenment…

Picture of Chogyam Trungpa the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Rinpoche’s collected works, in his own words…

Caroline begins.

“The path does not particularly have to be labeled as spiritual.”

Caroline continues.

“It is just a simple journey, the journey that contains exchange with the reality of this and that—or with the unreality of it, if you prefer.”

Allen replies.

“Relating with these exchanges—the living process, the being process—is the path.”

Caroline replies.

“We may be thinking of our path in terms of attaining enlightenment or of attaining egohood or whatever.”

Allen replies.

“In any case, we never get stuck in any way at all.”

Caroline replies.

“We might think we get stuck.”

Allen replies.

“We might feel bored with life and so forth; but we never really get bored or really get stuck.”

Caroline replies.

“The repetitiousness of life is not really repetition.”

Caroline continues.

“It is composed of constant happenings, situations constantly evolving, all the time.”

Allen replies.

“That is the path.”

Caroline replies.

“From this point of view, the path is neutral.”

Caroline continues.

“It is not biased one way or the other.”

Allen replies.

“There is a constant journey happening, which began at the time of the basic split.”

Caroline replies.

“We began to relate in terms of the other, me, mine, our,and so on.”

Allen replies.

“We began to relate with things as separate entities.”

Caroline continues.

“The other is called them and this thing is called I or me.

Allen replies.

“The journey began right from there.”

Caroline replies.

“That was the first creation of samsara and nirvana.”

Caroline continues.

“Right at the beginning, when we decided to connect in some way with the energy of situations, we involved ourselves in a journey, in the path.”

Allen replies.

“After that, we develop a certain way of relating with the path, and the path becomes conditioned toward either worldliness or spirituality.”

Caroline replies.

“In other words, spirituality is not really the path, but spirituality is a way of conditioning our path, our energy.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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2 Comments

Filed under Buddhism

2 responses to “Chogyam Trungpa on not getting stuck on the path to enlightenment…

  1. All this stuff is still too complicated for me.

    Namaste.

    • It’s just back story for the Naropa Prairie Dog Players, where they are coming from so to speak in terms of the larger narrative of the greater Karma Kagyu of which they are a part of as adopters of the Karmapa in America.

      It is worth noting that what the players are discussing are words spoken by Trungpa that he actually spoke to his students whom at the time had no background in Buddhism.”

      It is true that they weren’t your typical kids of the era, but in many ways they were, and they definitely weren’t more intelligent than you or most readers of this blog.

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