Chogyam Trungpa on the path in terms of three relationships…

Picture of Chogyam Trungpa at Freda Bedi’s Young Lamas Home School in Dalhousie, India, the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Rinpoche’s collected works, in his own words…

Virginia begins.

“We are taking the dharmakaya approach as long as we do not relate to the world as our enemy.”

Allen replies.

“The world is our opportune situation; it is of the overall process.”

Virginia replies.

“This is the dharmakaya mentality of all-encompassing space, of including everything without bias.”

Allen replies.

“It is a larger way of thinking, a greater way of viewing things, as opposed to being petty, finicky.”

Virginia replies.

“We are taking the dharmakaya approach as long as we do not relate to the world as our enemy. The world is our opportune situation; it is what we have to work with.”

Allen replies.

“Nothing that arises makes us have to fight with the world.”

Caroline replies.

“The world is the extraordinarily rich situation that is there; it is full of resources for us.”

Virginia replies.

“This basic approach of generosity and richness is the dharmakaya’s approach.”

Allen replies.

“It is total positive thinking.”

Jonathan replies.

“This greater vision is the first attitude in relation to the path.”

Virginia replies.

“Then we have the second attitude, connected with the sambhogakaya.”

Allen replies.

“Things are open and spacious and workable as we have said, but there is something more.”

Caroline replies.

“We also need to relate to the sparkiness, the energy, the flashes and aliveness that take place within that openness.”

Caroline continues.

“That energy, which includes aggression, passion, ignorance, pride, jealousy, and so forth, also has to be acknowledged.”

Allen replies.

“Anything that goes on in the realm of the mind can be accepted as the glittering light that shines through the massiveness of the spiritual path.”

Caroline replies.

“It shines constantly, surprises us constantly.”

Virginia replies.

“There is another corner of our being that is so alive, so energetic and powerful.”

Allen replies.

“There are discoveries happening all the time.”

Virginia replies.

“That is the sambhogakaya’s way of relating with the path.”

Allen replies.

“Thus, the path contains the larger sense of total acceptance of things as they are; and the path also contains what we might call fascination with the exciting discoveries within situations.”

Caroline replies.

“It is worth repeating here that we are not putting our experiences into pigeonholes of virtuous or religious or worldly.

Jonathan replies.

“We are just relating with the things that happen in our life situations.”

Allen replies.

“Those energies and passions that we encounter on our journey present us with continual discoveries of different facets of ourselves, different profiles of ourselves.”

Jonathan replies.

“At that point, things become rather interesting.”

Caroline replies.

“After all, we are not so blank or flat as we imagined ourselves to be.”

Virginia replies.

“Then we have the third kind of relationship with the path, which is connected with the nirmanakaya.”

Caroline replies.

“This is the basic practicality of existing in the world.”

Allen replies.

“We have the totality, we have the various energies, and then we have how to function in the world as it is, the living world.”

Caroline replies.

“This last aspect demands tremendous awareness and effort.”

Allen replies.

“We cannot simply leave it to the totality and the energy to take care of everything; we have to put some discipline into our approach to our life situations.”

Virginia replies.

“All the disciplines and techniques spoken of in spiritual traditions are connected with this nirmanakaya principle of application on the path.”

Jonathan replies.

“There is practicing meditation, working with the intellect, taking a further interest in relationships with each
other, developing fundamental compassion and a sense of communication, and developing knowledge or wisdom that is capable of looking at a whole situation and seeing the ways in which things might be workable.”

Virginia replies.

“All those are nirmanakaya disciplines.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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