Chogyam Trungpa on Buddha Nature, ruthlessness, and aggression… 

Picture of Dorje Bernakchen the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Rinpoche’s collected works, in his own words…

Virginia begins.

“Taken together, for three principles, or three stages—dharmakaya, sambhogakaya, nirmanakaya—provide us with a complete basis for our spiritual journey.”

Virginia continues.

“Because of them, the journey and out attitude toward it become something workable, something we can deal with directly and intelligently, without having to relegate it to some vague category like the mysteriousness of life.

Jonathan replies.

“In terms of our psychological state, these principles each have another characteristic, which it is worth mentioning here.”

Jonathan continues.

“As a psychological state, the dharmakaya is basic being.”

Allen replies.

“It is a totality in which confusion and ignorance have never existed; it is total existence that never needs any reference point.”

Virginia replies.

“The sambhogakaya is that which continually contains spontaneous energy, because it never depends on any cause-and-effect kind of energy.”

Virginia continues.

“The nirmanakaya is self-existing fulfillment in relation to which no strategizing about how to function is necessary.”

Jonathan replies.

“Those are the psychological aspects of buddha nature that develop.”

Caroline replies.

“We are discussing more the vajra-like samadhi of the Buddha and his way of relating with things, which of course is connected with buddha nature; we are
approaching that here as a sudden, direct transmission, a direct way, without going through the paramitas or the bhumis.”

Allen replies.

“The approach here is to regard oneself as being a buddha already.”

Allen continues.

“Buddha is the path rather than the goal.”

Caroline replies.

“We are working from the inside outward.”

Caroline continues.
“The mask is falling off by itself.”

Sally replies.

“This has more to do with
the attitude of taking a leap than actually taking the leap.”

Sally continues.

“You are willing to leap, so then there is the situation of leaping.”
Caroline replies.

Caroline replies.

“The important thing here is the basic spirit or outlook you have, rather than just the particular application of how you handle things.”

Caroline continues.

“It is something much bigger than that.”

Karl replies.

“No one can con you.”

Caroline replies.

“No one can seduce you in an unhealthy direction.”

Karl replies.

“It is ruthlessness in that sense rather than in the conventional sense of illogical aggression—such
aggression—such as in the case of Mussolini or Hitler or someone like that.”

Karl continues.

“You cannot be conned or seduced; you would not accept that.”

Caroline replies.

“Even attempts to seduce you arouse energy that is destructive toward that attempted seduction.”

Virginia replies.

“If you are completely open and completely aroused in terms of crazy wisdom, no one can lure you into their territory.”

Virginia continues.

“You don’t maintain the ruthlessness.”

Karl replies.

“Your ruthlessness is maintained by others.”

Karl continues.

“You don’t maintain anything at all.”

Virginia replies.

“You just be there, and whatever situation comes to you, you just project back.”

Jonathan replies.

“Take the example of fire.”

Jonathan continues.

“It does not possess its destructiveness.”

Sally replies.

“That just happens.”

Sally continues.

“When you put something in the fire or try to kill the fire, its offensive power just comes out.”

Jonathan replies.

“It is the organic or chemical nature of fire.”

Karl replies.

“That’s the whole point of the transcendental type of ruthlessness.”

Virginia replies.

“It does not need judgment.”

Karl replies.

“The situation brings the action.”

Virginia replies.
“You simply react, because the elements contain aggression.”

Sally replies.

“If the elements are interfered with or dealt with in an irreverent or unskillful way, they hit you back.”

Sally replies.

“Ruthlessness may seem to survive on a sense of relativity, of this versus that, but in fact it actually does not.”

Caroline replies.

“It is absolute.”

Sally replies.

“Others present a relative notion, which you cut through.”

Caroline replies.

“This state of being is not on a relative level at all.”

Caroline continues.

“In other words, this absoluteness cuts through the relative notion that comes to it, but still it remains self-contained.”

Sally replies.

“It is ego’s intensity that brings forth uncompassionate measures.”

Sally continues.

“When neurosis and confusion reach an extreme point, the only way to correct the
confusion is by destroying it.”

Karl replies.

“You have to completely shatter the whole thing.”

Karl continues.

“That process of destruction is demanded by the confusion itself rather than it being a question of somebody thinking it is a good idea to destroy the confusion by force.”

Virginia replies.

“No other thinking is involved.”

Virginia continues .

“The intensity of confusion itself demands its own destruction.”

Sally replies.

“Ruthlessness is just putting that energy into action.”

Allen replies.

“It is just letting that energy burn itself out rather than your killing something.”

Allen pauses.

“You just let ego’s neurosis commit suicide rather than killing it.”

Allen continues.

“That’s the ruthlessness.”

Jonathan replies.

“Ego is killing itself ruthlessly, and you are providing the accommodation for that.”

Allen replies.

“This is not warfare.”

Jonathan replies.

“You are there, and therefore it happens.”

Virginia replies.

“On the other hand, if you are not there, there is the possibility of scapegoats and sidetracks of all kinds.”

Virginia continues.

“But if you are there, you don’t even actually have to be ruthless.”

Allen replies.

“Just be there; from the point of view of ego, that is ruthless.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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5 Comments

Filed under Buddhism

5 responses to “Chogyam Trungpa on Buddha Nature, ruthlessness, and aggression… 

  1. Hooray, the first trolls of 2016 have arrived.

    They have been roused…

  2. Lama Mathy

    Lol, Bill you can delete my posts. I don’t care, but you have to admit, without my constituents you’d have no quality content.

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