Chogyam Trungpa on enlightenment inside out…

Picture of Chogyam Trungpa the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Rinpoche’s collected works, in his own words…

Virginia replies.

“The whole point is that tantra is contagious.”

Virginia continues.

“It involves a very powerful substance, which is buddha nature eating out from the inside rather than being reached by stripping away layers from the outside.”

Jonathan replies.

“It is a different perspective altogether; it is not the point of view of sentient beings trying to attain enlightenment, but the point of view of an enlightened person trying to relate with sentient beings.”

Virginia replies.

“That is why the tantric approach is that of eating outward, from the inside to the outside.”

Allen replies.

“We are telling the story from the inside rather than looking at somebody else’s newsreel taken from the outside.”

Sally replies.

“How does the eating away outward take place?”

Caroline replies.

“Through dealing with situations skillfully.

Caroline continues.

“The situations are already created for you, and you just go out and launch yourself along with them.”

Allen replies.

“It is a self-existing jigsaw puzzle that has been put together by itself.”

Virginia replies.

“Sambhogakaya is the energy principle, or the dance principle—dharmakaya being the total background.”

Allen replies.

“It is the positive aspect that is left by the unmasking process.”

Allen continues.

“In other words, you get the absence of aggression and that absence is turned into energy.”

Jonathan replies.

“Transmuted.”

Allen replies.

“It is even more than transmutation—I don’t know what sort of a word there is.”

Allen continues.

“The defilements are being so completely related to that their function becomes useless, but their nonfunctioning becomes useful.”

Virginia replies.

“There is another kind of energy in sambhogakaya.”

Virginia continues.

“You have to be pushed into it.”

Allen replies.

“That is where the relationship between teacher and student comes in.”

Sally replies.

“Somebody has to push.”

Allen replies.

“That is the very primitive level at the beginning.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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