The crazy wisdom of letting go of hoping for a healthier, better you…

Picture of Shinje-Gyalpo, lord of the hell of trying to improve ourselves, the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Chogyam Trungpa’s collected works, on letting go of the hope of a better, healthier you…

Caroline begins.

“We think that everything exists for our benefit.”

Caroline continues.

“For instance, we think the body is extremely important, because it maintains the mind.”

Sally replies.

“The mind feeds the body and the body feeds the mind.”

Sally continues.

“We feel it is important to keep this happening in a healthy manner for our benefit, and we have come to the conclusion that the easiest way to achieve this tremendous scheme of being healthy is to start with the less complicated side of it: feed the body.”

Caroline replies.

“Then all we have to do is wait and see what happens with the mind.”

Caroline continues.

“We believe that If we can only do this then we are more likely to be psychologically fit, that we are on to something.”
Sally replies.

“Healthy body, healthy mind.”

Jonathan replies.

“It makes perfect sense to us.”

Jonathan continues.

“It is extremely sane, extremely realistic, very reasonable and logical.”

Virginia replies.

“There is a pattern there to be respected.”

Virginia continues.

“If you put the pattern into practice the pattern will continue and you will achieve your results.”

Karl replies.

“This framework is purely body-oriented.”

Karl continues.

“We believe that our body will feed a higher state of consciousness.”

Sally replies.

“What do we really mean by ‘mind’ though?”

Sally continues.

“What is the ‘body’?”

Virginia replies.

“The body consists of that which needs to be fed; the mind is that which needs to survey whether the body is fed properly.”

Karl replies.

“So needing to be fed is another part of the aggregate of the structure of mind.”

Karl continues.

“The whole problem we have from this perspective comes from our not having fed ourselves properly in the past, our not maintaining our health properly.”

Allen replies.

“This problem though, in terms of crazy wisdom, comes from our belief in the separateness of ‘I’ and ‘that’.”

Allen replies.

“I am separate from my food and my food is not me; therefore, I have to consume that particular food that is not me so that it can become part of me.”

Sally replies.

“The idea is that we have to create an object of worship and then eat the object of worship—chew it, swallow it.”

Sally continues.

“Once we have digested it, we believe ourselves to be whole.”

Karl replies.

“The fact that unless you do this you cannot be whole shows that this is still an act of separateness.”

Sally replies.

“Eating right seems to destroy the separateness, but fundamentally the separateness is still there.”

Karl replies.

“It is only a matter of time before you end up with the separateness again.”

Karl continues.

“Therein lies the problem with this approach.”

Caroline replies.

“Our sense of being whole is based on a physical act, of doing something—on what we eat.”

Sally replies.
“To become whole though, I have to give up the hope of becoming whole.”

Allen replies.

“In other words, in relation to ‘this’ exists and ‘that’ exists, I have to give up the hope that I can make my hope a reality.”

Sally replies.

“We give up hope.”

Allen replies.

“I don’t care if ‘that’ exists or ‘this’ exists; yes, I give up hope.”

“This hopelessness is the starting point of realization, of taking the goal as our path, of crazy wisdom, what we are about as dharma practitioners living in the West today.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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