The crazy wisdom of manifesting the three kayas in our daily lives…

Picture of “The Three Stooges” the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Chogyam Trungpa’s collected works in which they discuss the crazy wisdom of of manifesting the three kayas in our daily life…

Jonathan begins.

“This sense of hopelessness we are discussing here is our starting point for relating to crazy wisdom.”

Jonathan continues.

“If our sense of hopelessness is able to cut through our unrealistic goals, then our hopelessness becomes something we can actually work with.”

Allen replies.

“We are no longer trying to make something of ourselves.”

Caroline replies.

“There is no duality in hopelessness as such.”

Caroline continues.

“Our sense of hopelessness connects us directly, practically speaking, with our everyday lives.”

Sally replies.

“It just is.”

Jonathan replies.

“If we are able to see that ‘isness,’ so to speak, then there is realization, the experience of sudden enlightenment.”

Jonathan continues.

“Without hopelessness, there is no way to realize sudden enlightenment.”

Allen replies.

“Only by giving up our projects can we bring about the ultimate, definite, positive state of being, which is the realization that we are already enlightened beings here and now.”

Virginia replies.

“In discussing the details of this state, we could say that even in experiencing a sense of buddha nature, we still have to have that experience, which is connected with the samsaric, or confused, part of our being in that it is dependent on the experience of something.”

Virginia pauses.

“Experience involves a sense of duality.”

Virginia continues.

“You have an experience and you relate with that experience; you relate with it as something separate; there is a separation between you and what you experience.”

Sally replies.

“We are dealing with a subject matter, experience.”

Virginia replies.

“Though there is still a sense of separateness, of duality, nevertheless it is an experience of being awake, of realizing buddha within us.”

Sally replies.

“So we begin to develop some sense of space between the experience and the projection of the experience.”

Caroline replies,

“There is a forward-moving journey of trying to catch some particular aspect in us that is sane.”

Sally replies.

“And making that effort, becoming involved in that particular relationship, brings our sense of space somewhere.”

Jonathan replies.

“It is like when we are just about to say something.”

Jonathan pauses.

“First we have to experience the unsaid things.”

Jonathan continues.

“We feel the space of what we haven’t said yet.”

Allen replies.

“We feel the space, and then we say whatever we say, which accentuates the space in a certain way, makes it into a definite perspective.”

Jonathan replies.

“In order to express space, we have to draw the boundary of space.”

Allen replies.

“That kind of sense of openness that happens when we are just about to say something or just about to experience something is a kind of sense of emptiness.”

Jonathan replies.

“This experience of emptiness is the dharmakaya.”

Virginia replies.

“In order to give birth, we have to have an accommodation for giving birth to this realization of this sense of the absence of birth before giving birth that is the dharmakaya.”

Sally replies.

“Dharmakaya is unconditioned.”

Allen replies.

“The leap has already been made.”

Jonathan replies.

“Once we decide to leap, we have leapt already.”

Allen replies.

“The leaping itself is somewhat repetitious or redundant.”

Virginia replies.

“We are talking about that kind of sense of space in which the leap, the birth, is already given though not yet manifested.”

Sally replies.

“It is not yet manifested, but it is as good as already manifested.”

Virginia replies.

“In that state of mind in which we are about to experience, say, drinking a cup of tea, we have drunk a cup of tea already before we drink it.”

Sally replies.

“And we have said things already before we actually say them on a manifest level.”

Virginia replies.

“That kind of pregnant, embryonic, fertile ground that happens in our state of mind constantly is also unconditioned, as well as being pregnant with something.”

Sally replies.

“It is unconditioned in relation to my ego, or dualistic mind, my actions, my love and hate, and so on.”

Virginia replies.

“In relation to all that, it is unconditioned.”

Sally replies.

“Thus, we have this kind of unconditioned glimpse happening in our state of mind constantly.”

Sally continues.

“This experience of dharmakaya is the starting point or ground of crazy wisdom.”

Virginia replies.

“The embryonic manifestation here is the dharma, the dharma of possibilities that have happened already, existing things that exist in nonexistence.”

Virginia continues.

“It is the sense of fertility, complete fullness yet intangibility, in our daily experience.”

Jonathan replies.

“Before an emotion arises, we prepare ourselves toward that.”

Allen replies.

“Before we put our actions into effect, there are preparations toward that.”

Jonathan replies.

“That sense of occupied space, self-existing space, is dharma.”

Allen replies.

Kaya is ‘form,’ or ‘body,’ the statement that such dharma does exist.”

Jonathan replies.

“The body of dharma is the dharmakaya.”

Sally replies.

“Then we have the second level of manifestation, the sambhava, the sambhogakaya, in our state of being.”

Allen replies.

“This is the borderline between fullness and emptiness.”

Allen continues.

“There is the sense that the fullness of it becomes valid, because it is emptiness.”

Jonathan replies.

“In other words, it is a kind of affirmation of the existence of emptiness.”

Virginia replies.

“There is the spaciousness where the emotions begin to arise, where anger is just about to burst out or has burst out already, but there still needs to be a sambhogakaya.”

Jonathan replies.

Sam means ‘complete,’ bhoga means ‘joy’.”

Caroline replies.

“Joy here is occupation or energy, rather than joy in the sense of pleasure as opposed to pain.”

Caroline continues.

“It is occupation, action existing for itself, emotions existing for themselves.”

Sally replies.

“But though it exists for itself, it is rootless as far as relative truth is concerned.”

“There is no basis for the arising of an emotion, yet emotions still occur, out of nowhere, their energy springs forth, sparks out, constantly.”

Jonathan replies.

“Then we have nirmanakaya.”

Virginia replies.

Nirmana, in this case, is the emanation, or manifestation—the complete manifestation or final act.”

Virginia continues.

“It is like when a child has already been born and the doctor cuts the umbilical cord to make sure that the child is separate from its father and mother.”

Sally replies.

“It is now an independent entity.”

Allen replies.

“This is parallel to the bursting of the emotions into the fascinated world outside.”

Jonathan replies.

“At this point, the object of passion or the object of aggression, or whatever, comes out very powerfully and very definitely.”

Karl replies.

“This does not particularly refer to applying the emotions, for example, using anger as an influence for killing a person or passion as an influence for magnetizing a person.”

Caroline replies.

“Still, there is a sense that, before actual words are spoken or actual bodily movements have occurred, the emotions have occurred; there has been a final definition of the emotions and they have become separate from you.”

Caroline continues.

“You have officially cut the umbilical cord between you and your emotions.”

Karl replies.

“They have already occurred outwardly—they have become a separate thing.”

Caroline replies.

“This is the final manifestation.”

Jonathan replies.

“When we talk here about anger or passion or ignorance/bewilderment, whatever we talk about, we are not speaking in moralistic terms of good and bad.”

Jonathan continues.

“We are speaking of tremendously highly charged emotions that contain the energy of their vividness.”

Allen replies.

“We could say that our lives consist of this tremendous vividness all the time: the vividness of being bored, being angry, being in love, being proud, being jealous.”

Jonathan replies.

“Our lives consist of all these kinds of vividness rather than of virtues or sins”.

Sally replies.

“What we are talking about here is the essence of crazy wisdom.”

Virginia replies.

“There is this vividness of manifesting in our lives constantly through the process of giving birth: experiencing a sense of space, then manifesting, then finally concluding that manifestation.”

Sally replies.

“So here we have the threefold process, of the dharmakaya as the embryonic space, the sambhogakaya as the forwarding quality, and the nirmanakaya in which it actually finally manifests itself.”

Jonathan replies.

“All these situations are the vividness of crazy wisdom, the three principles of the trikaya.”

Allen replies.

“Unless we realize the subtleties of the energies involved in crazy wisdom, we have no chance of understanding it.”

Jonathan replies.

“Without understanding the trikaya, we might think that when crazy wisdom manifests in its different aspects it is like one person wearing different hats: his business hat, his hunting hat, his yogi hat, his scholar hat, and so on.”

Sally replies.

“It is not like that.”

Sally continues.

“It is not like one person changing costumes; rather it has to do with the vividness of life.”

Virginia replies.

“What we are trying to point to here is that crazy wisdom is our experience.”

Sally replies.

“We are trying to relate with the crazy wisdom us all, in our state of being.”

Jonathan replies.

“ThIs crazy wisdom-ness within us all consists of these three constituents: the dharmakaya, or open space; the sambhogakaya, or forward energy; and the nirmanakaya, or actual manifestation.”

Allen replies.

“We might say to ourselves at this point, ‘This is supposed to be crazy wisdom; what’s so crazy about any of this? Energy happens, space is there. Is there anything about this that is unusual, anything crazy or wise?’ Actually, there is nothing—nothing crazy about it and nothing wise about it.”

Jonathan replies.

“The only thing that makes it extraordinary is that it happens to be true.”

Allen replies.

“We need only realize that there is within us this energy that is always there, and that this energy contains everything we need.”

Allen continues.

“This energy is neither dualistic nor interdependent; it is a self-existing energy within us all.”

Karl replies.

“We have our passion, our aggression; we have our own space, our own energy—it’s there already.”

Karl continues.

“It exists without depending on our respective situations.”

Virginia replies.

“It is absolute and perfect and independent.”

Virginia continues.

“It is free from any form of relationships.”

Sally replies.

“This is the point of crazy wisdom.”

Caroline replies.

“The principle of crazy wisdom is that in freedom from any speculative ideas or theories or activity of watching ourself, there is this living experience of emotions and experiences without a watcher.”

Karl replies.

“Gaining such confidence, such vajra pride, gives us a further opportunity.”

Caroline replies.

“It is not hard to imagine that when you know what you are and who you are completely, anything is possible.”

Caroline continues.

“You are free to explore the rest of the world beyond yourself because, finally, you are at last over yourself as such.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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3 Comments

Filed under Buddhism

3 responses to “The crazy wisdom of manifesting the three kayas in our daily lives…

  1. Hillary

    In the immortal words of mahasattva Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche, North American Representative of His Holiness the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa: “French Fried Taters”!

  2. Randy

    I applaud the new direction that this blog has taken. It presents a fresh and sorely needed presentation of Buddhist praxis that is unavailable at the feet of the lamas of KTD, many of whom teach with such tightly clenched butt cheeks that one gets lung disorder just hearing them recite refuge.

    We must practice as if out genitals are flapping freely in the wind- with lack of piety and self-importantance.

  3. My experience with Buddhism summed up into 4 sentences:

    1) Our “mind” thinks shit up.
    2) Sometimes it thinks up scary shit that is completely irrational – let that shit go as soon as you realize you’ve gone there. DO NOT try to judge if that crazy shit is right or wrong, it is a natural result of the thinking shit up thing.
    3) Our innate nature is to maintain harmony. Maintain harmony whenever possible to reduce suffering. (Note: Please refer again to #2, in order to maintain harmony, you will have to skillfully manage your own or someone else’s irrational shit.)
    4) Honor the preciousness of your birth. 99.99% of the universe is inaminate and without consciousness and it’ll be over in the blink of an eye.

    End of story.

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