Just seeing things as they are isn’t crazy enough for us as Buddhists…

Picture of someone in Paris having a cup of coffee the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Chogyam Trungpa’s collected works in which they discuss how just seeing things as they are isn’t crazy enough for us as Buddhists…

Jonathan begins.

“If we look at grasping in a matter-of-fact way, it’s actually very spacious.”

Jonathan continues.

“But we regard grasping as an insult to ourselves.”

Allen replies.

“That’s why it becomes an insult.”

Jonathan replies.

“But grasping as it is, is actually very spacious.”

Allen replies.

“Very spacious.”

Jonathan replies.

“That’s the dharmakaya itself.”

Virginia replies.

“There is an experience, a movement towards something, something seems to be happening, which in turn, naturally gains momentum .”

Sally replies.

“I regard what I am experiencing as something experienceable.”

Virginia replies.

“This energy is the dharmakaya we have been discussing here.”

Sally replies.

“All three kayas connect with this energy, the energy of manifestion.”

Jonathan replies.

“The three kayas are all included in this energy.”

Allen replies.

“That’s why they are called kayas.”

Caroline replies.

“The whole point when we talk about crazy wisdom is that crazy wisdom is the three kayas, a combination of both samsara and nirvana at the same time.”

Karl replies.

“At this point, as far as what I am experiencing is concerned, samsara and nirvana are one in the same within what we experience.”

Jonathan replies.

“What we are concerned with here is this energy.”

Allen replies.

“It’s neither conditioned nor unconditioned, but rather its own existence is absolute in its own way.”

Virginia replies.

“It is samsaric, no doubt, but without this samsaric element, we would have nothing to be crazy about.”

Sally replies.

“This is what crazy wisdom is all about.”

Virginia replies.

“Take for example this cup of coffee, the sense of relating with it as an external object, which is like cutting the umbilical cord, as we previously discussed, the Nirmanakaya.”

Sally replies.

“My relating with my coffee as something out there is the nirmanakaya.”

Karl replies.

“You need not do anything about your coffee for this to be so.”

Caroline replies.

“Rather, there are three types of solidification of experience related with our coffee, the threefold states of being of the mind.”

Karl replies.

“Its coffee-ness is the nirmanakaya.”

Jonathan replies.

“The sambhogakaya is the sense of slight separateness, as opposed to the abstract idea of our having coffee, or not.”

Allen replies.

“The journey, as such.”

Virginia replies.

“Once you are pregnant, it is already a statement of separation, and it is a further expression of separation when you give birth; then the final statement is when you cut the umbilical cord; that is the final state of separateness.”

Karl replies.

“All of which brings us back to our discussion of hopelessness.”

Karl continues.

“There is no comfort to be found in our coffee, its manifestation as a process.”

Caroline replies.

“The dharmakaya exists, sambhogakaya exists, nirmanakaya exists, and each has its own function, relatively speaking.”

Caroline continues.

“There’s no recipe for how to make yourself happy in any of this.”

Karl replies.

“At this point, it has nothing to do with bringing happiness into our lives, or goodness or comfort or anything else like that.”

Sally replies.

“It’s hopeless.”

Jonathan replies.

“Even if you know the dharmakaya, sambhogakaya, and nirmanakaya from back to front, what does that mean to you?”

Allen replies.

“Even if you understand the energy principle, the independence and potency of your energy, apart from that, it’s still hopeless.”

Virginia replies.

“Just seeing things as they are is not quite crazy enough though”

Jonathan replies.

“There is an old saying that the path is the goal and the goal is the path.”

Sally replies.

“You make your journey, you get to your destination, and arriving at that destination brings on another question: how to proceed from there?”

Sally continues.

“As such, each goal itself becomes the path.”

Caroline replies.

“From the tantric point of view, we don’t achieve anything except this, the discovery of our path.”

Sally replies.
“Suddenly, you see it, how your path and goal are one in the same, or not.”

Caroline replies.

“It’s always sudden, regardless.”

Karl replies.

“At least until we give up the path—and the goal our sudden enlightenment is available to us.”

Jonathan replies.

“The gradual path regards the goal as the goal and the path as the doctrine.”

Jonathan continues.

“And the sudden path regards the path as the goal as well as the goal as the path.”

Allen replies.

“There’s no room for doctrine.”

Allen continues.

“It is just a matter of personal experience all the time.”

Caroline replies.

“If you had to give a definition of the difference between gradual and sudden enlightenment, there you have it.”

Caroline continues.

“Naturally, the whole existence of the three kayas is a kind of projection in which you manufacture the projections.”

Sally replies.

“So in other words, the very existence of the dharma itself is a projection.”

Karl replies.

“Insanity or sanity, both are projections.”

Karl continues.

“And since everything is done that way, the whole thing becomes a projection and something solid to us, both at the same time.”

Virginia replies.

“We only value time after we waste it.”

Virginia continues.

“It’s all up to you.”

Jonathan replies.

“Each time you develop a manifestation, you create your own stuff—right at the beginning.”

Allen replies.

“Dharmakaya creates its own existence and its environment as well.”

Jonathan replies.

“Our lives are a charnel ground—a place to dissolve, a place to manifest.”

Virginia replies.

“The sambhogakaya acknowledges the energy of the dharmakaya, you could say, and the nirmanakaya puts it into practice.”

Virginia continues.

“Apart from that, there’s no difference as such.”

Karl replies.

“The sambhogakaya is acknowledging the energy in the sense of its receptiveness to the reality of the dharmakaya.”

Allen replies.

“Sambogakaya acknowledges the luminosity of dharmakaya’s projections, that our projections appear to be something separate; and then what you do with this separateness, your projections, is handled by the nirmanakaya.”

Allen continues.

“The nirmanakaya could be described as the domestic matter of how to handle your kitchen-sink problem, whereas the sambhogakaya is like getting married to begin with to create our kitchen-sink problem in the first place; the dharmakaya is like courting, something fraught with all kinds of possibilities.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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The crazy wisdom of manifesting the three kayas in our daily lives…

Picture of “The Three Stooges” the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Chogyam Trungpa’s collected works in which they discuss the crazy wisdom of of manifesting the three kayas in our daily life…

Jonathan begins.

“This sense of hopelessness we are discussing here is our starting point for relating to crazy wisdom.”

Jonathan continues.

“If our sense of hopelessness is able to cut through our unrealistic goals, then our hopelessness becomes something we can actually work with.”

Allen replies.

“We are no longer trying to make something of ourselves.”

Caroline replies.

“There is no duality in hopelessness as such.”

Caroline continues.

“Our sense of hopelessness connects us directly, practically speaking, with our everyday lives.”

Sally replies.

“It just is.”

Jonathan replies.

“If we are able to see that ‘isness,’ so to speak, then there is realization, the experience of sudden enlightenment.”

Jonathan continues.

“Without hopelessness, there is no way to realize sudden enlightenment.”

Allen replies.

“Only by giving up our projects can we bring about the ultimate, definite, positive state of being, which is the realization that we are already enlightened beings here and now.”

Virginia replies.

“In discussing the details of this state, we could say that even in experiencing a sense of buddha nature, we still have to have that experience, which is connected with the samsaric, or confused, part of our being in that it is dependent on the experience of something.”

Virginia pauses.

“Experience involves a sense of duality.”

Virginia continues.

“You have an experience and you relate with that experience; you relate with it as something separate; there is a separation between you and what you experience.”

Sally replies.

“We are dealing with a subject matter, experience.”

Virginia replies.

“Though there is still a sense of separateness, of duality, nevertheless it is an experience of being awake, of realizing buddha within us.”

Sally replies.

“So we begin to develop some sense of space between the experience and the projection of the experience.”

Caroline replies,

“There is a forward-moving journey of trying to catch some particular aspect in us that is sane.”

Sally replies.

“And making that effort, becoming involved in that particular relationship, brings our sense of space somewhere.”

Jonathan replies.

“It is like when we are just about to say something.”

Jonathan pauses.

“First we have to experience the unsaid things.”

Jonathan continues.

“We feel the space of what we haven’t said yet.”

Allen replies.

“We feel the space, and then we say whatever we say, which accentuates the space in a certain way, makes it into a definite perspective.”

Jonathan replies.

“In order to express space, we have to draw the boundary of space.”

Allen replies.

“That kind of sense of openness that happens when we are just about to say something or just about to experience something is a kind of sense of emptiness.”

Jonathan replies.

“This experience of emptiness is the dharmakaya.”

Virginia replies.

“In order to give birth, we have to have an accommodation for giving birth to this realization of this sense of the absence of birth before giving birth that is the dharmakaya.”

Sally replies.

“Dharmakaya is unconditioned.”

Allen replies.

“The leap has already been made.”

Jonathan replies.

“Once we decide to leap, we have leapt already.”

Allen replies.

“The leaping itself is somewhat repetitious or redundant.”

Virginia replies.

“We are talking about that kind of sense of space in which the leap, the birth, is already given though not yet manifested.”

Sally replies.

“It is not yet manifested, but it is as good as already manifested.”

Virginia replies.

“In that state of mind in which we are about to experience, say, drinking a cup of tea, we have drunk a cup of tea already before we drink it.”

Sally replies.

“And we have said things already before we actually say them on a manifest level.”

Virginia replies.

“That kind of pregnant, embryonic, fertile ground that happens in our state of mind constantly is also unconditioned, as well as being pregnant with something.”

Sally replies.

“It is unconditioned in relation to my ego, or dualistic mind, my actions, my love and hate, and so on.”

Virginia replies.

“In relation to all that, it is unconditioned.”

Sally replies.

“Thus, we have this kind of unconditioned glimpse happening in our state of mind constantly.”

Sally continues.

“This experience of dharmakaya is the starting point or ground of crazy wisdom.”

Virginia replies.

“The embryonic manifestation here is the dharma, the dharma of possibilities that have happened already, existing things that exist in nonexistence.”

Virginia continues.

“It is the sense of fertility, complete fullness yet intangibility, in our daily experience.”

Jonathan replies.

“Before an emotion arises, we prepare ourselves toward that.”

Allen replies.

“Before we put our actions into effect, there are preparations toward that.”

Jonathan replies.

“That sense of occupied space, self-existing space, is dharma.”

Allen replies.

Kaya is ‘form,’ or ‘body,’ the statement that such dharma does exist.”

Jonathan replies.

“The body of dharma is the dharmakaya.”

Sally replies.

“Then we have the second level of manifestation, the sambhava, the sambhogakaya, in our state of being.”

Allen replies.

“This is the borderline between fullness and emptiness.”

Allen continues.

“There is the sense that the fullness of it becomes valid, because it is emptiness.”

Jonathan replies.

“In other words, it is a kind of affirmation of the existence of emptiness.”

Virginia replies.

“There is the spaciousness where the emotions begin to arise, where anger is just about to burst out or has burst out already, but there still needs to be a sambhogakaya.”

Jonathan replies.

Sam means ‘complete,’ bhoga means ‘joy’.”

Caroline replies.

“Joy here is occupation or energy, rather than joy in the sense of pleasure as opposed to pain.”

Caroline continues.

“It is occupation, action existing for itself, emotions existing for themselves.”

Sally replies.

“But though it exists for itself, it is rootless as far as relative truth is concerned.”

“There is no basis for the arising of an emotion, yet emotions still occur, out of nowhere, their energy springs forth, sparks out, constantly.”

Jonathan replies.

“Then we have nirmanakaya.”

Virginia replies.

Nirmana, in this case, is the emanation, or manifestation—the complete manifestation or final act.”

Virginia continues.

“It is like when a child has already been born and the doctor cuts the umbilical cord to make sure that the child is separate from its father and mother.”

Sally replies.

“It is now an independent entity.”

Allen replies.

“This is parallel to the bursting of the emotions into the fascinated world outside.”

Jonathan replies.

“At this point, the object of passion or the object of aggression, or whatever, comes out very powerfully and very definitely.”

Karl replies.

“This does not particularly refer to applying the emotions, for example, using anger as an influence for killing a person or passion as an influence for magnetizing a person.”

Caroline replies.

“Still, there is a sense that, before actual words are spoken or actual bodily movements have occurred, the emotions have occurred; there has been a final definition of the emotions and they have become separate from you.”

Caroline continues.

“You have officially cut the umbilical cord between you and your emotions.”

Karl replies.

“They have already occurred outwardly—they have become a separate thing.”

Caroline replies.

“This is the final manifestation.”

Jonathan replies.

“When we talk here about anger or passion or ignorance/bewilderment, whatever we talk about, we are not speaking in moralistic terms of good and bad.”

Jonathan continues.

“We are speaking of tremendously highly charged emotions that contain the energy of their vividness.”

Allen replies.

“We could say that our lives consist of this tremendous vividness all the time: the vividness of being bored, being angry, being in love, being proud, being jealous.”

Jonathan replies.

“Our lives consist of all these kinds of vividness rather than of virtues or sins”.

Sally replies.

“What we are talking about here is the essence of crazy wisdom.”

Virginia replies.

“There is this vividness of manifesting in our lives constantly through the process of giving birth: experiencing a sense of space, then manifesting, then finally concluding that manifestation.”

Sally replies.

“So here we have the threefold process, of the dharmakaya as the embryonic space, the sambhogakaya as the forwarding quality, and the nirmanakaya in which it actually finally manifests itself.”

Jonathan replies.

“All these situations are the vividness of crazy wisdom, the three principles of the trikaya.”

Allen replies.

“Unless we realize the subtleties of the energies involved in crazy wisdom, we have no chance of understanding it.”

Jonathan replies.

“Without understanding the trikaya, we might think that when crazy wisdom manifests in its different aspects it is like one person wearing different hats: his business hat, his hunting hat, his yogi hat, his scholar hat, and so on.”

Sally replies.

“It is not like that.”

Sally continues.

“It is not like one person changing costumes; rather it has to do with the vividness of life.”

Virginia replies.

“What we are trying to point to here is that crazy wisdom is our experience.”

Sally replies.

“We are trying to relate with the crazy wisdom us all, in our state of being.”

Jonathan replies.

“ThIs crazy wisdom-ness within us all consists of these three constituents: the dharmakaya, or open space; the sambhogakaya, or forward energy; and the nirmanakaya, or actual manifestation.”

Allen replies.

“We might say to ourselves at this point, ‘This is supposed to be crazy wisdom; what’s so crazy about any of this? Energy happens, space is there. Is there anything about this that is unusual, anything crazy or wise?’ Actually, there is nothing—nothing crazy about it and nothing wise about it.”

Jonathan replies.

“The only thing that makes it extraordinary is that it happens to be true.”

Allen replies.

“We need only realize that there is within us this energy that is always there, and that this energy contains everything we need.”

Allen continues.

“This energy is neither dualistic nor interdependent; it is a self-existing energy within us all.”

Karl replies.

“We have our passion, our aggression; we have our own space, our own energy—it’s there already.”

Karl continues.

“It exists without depending on our respective situations.”

Virginia replies.

“It is absolute and perfect and independent.”

Virginia continues.

“It is free from any form of relationships.”

Sally replies.

“This is the point of crazy wisdom.”

Caroline replies.

“The principle of crazy wisdom is that in freedom from any speculative ideas or theories or activity of watching ourself, there is this living experience of emotions and experiences without a watcher.”

Karl replies.

“Gaining such confidence, such vajra pride, gives us a further opportunity.”

Caroline replies.

“It is not hard to imagine that when you know what you are and who you are completely, anything is possible.”

Caroline continues.

“You are free to explore the rest of the world beyond yourself because, finally, you are at last over yourself as such.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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Not your KTD dharma: letting go of hoping to understand anything at all..

Picture of Marpa the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Chogyam Trungpa’s collected works in which they discuss the crazy wisdom of letting go of hoping to understand anything at all…

Jonathan replies.

“The approach of crazy wisdom that we are discussing here is to give up hope.”

Jonathan continues.

“There is no hope of understanding anything at all.”

Allen replies.

“There is no hope of finding out who did what or what did what or how anything works.”

Sally replies.

“We have given up our ambition to put the jigsaw puzzle together.”

Jonathan replies.

“Give it up altogether, absolutely; throw it up in the air, let it go.”

Jonathan continues.

“Unless we give up this hope, this precious hope, there is no way out at all.”

Allen replies.

“It is like trying to work out who is in control of the body or the mind, who has the closest link with some higher power—or what is true, as we would say as Buddhists.”

Karl replies.

“As Buddhists we take the position that the Buddha discovered the truth.”

Karl continues.

“The Buddha’s truth doesn’t depend on some higher power to be true.”

Sally replies.

“The Buddha didn’t believe in a higher power.”

Sally continues.

“The Buddha’s truth doesn’t depend on the existence of a truth-maker.”

Virginia replies.
“It is useless for us to fight over this.”

Virginia continues.

“The situation is completely hopeless, absolutely hopeless.”

Karl replies.

“We do not understand—and we have no possibility of understanding—anything at all.”

Allen replies.

“It is hopeless to look for something to understand, for something to discover, because there is no discovery at all at the end, unless we manufacture one.”

Allen continues.

“Even if we somehow manufacture a discovery, we aren’t particularly happy about it for long.”

Sally replies.

“We have only cheated ourselves in the process.”

Allen replies.

“Between ‘me’ and ‘that’.”

Jonathan replies.

“So the introductory process of  crazy wisdom is giving up hope, giving up hope completely.”

Sally replies.

“Nobody is going to comfort us, nobody is going to save us from ourselves.”

Virginia replies.

“The whole idea of trying to find the root or some logic for crazy wisdom, as some kind of truth, is completely hopeless.”

Karl replies.

“There is no ground, so there is no hope.”

Caroline replies.

“Exactly.”

Caroline continues.

“There is also no fear for that matter, but we better not talk about that too much, at least at this point in our discussion.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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The crazy wisdom of letting go of hoping for a healthier, better you…

Picture of Shinje-Gyalpo, lord of the hell of trying to improve ourselves, the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Chogyam Trungpa’s collected works, on letting go of the hope of a better, healthier you…

Caroline begins.

“We think that everything exists for our benefit.”

Caroline continues.

“For instance, we think the body is extremely important, because it maintains the mind.”

Sally replies.

“The mind feeds the body and the body feeds the mind.”

Sally continues.

“We feel it is important to keep this happening in a healthy manner for our benefit, and we have come to the conclusion that the easiest way to achieve this tremendous scheme of being healthy is to start with the less complicated side of it: feed the body.”

Caroline replies.

“Then all we have to do is wait and see what happens with the mind.”

Caroline continues.

“We believe that If we can only do this then we are more likely to be psychologically fit, that we are on to something.”
Sally replies.

“Healthy body, healthy mind.”

Jonathan replies.

“It makes perfect sense to us.”

Jonathan continues.

“It is extremely sane, extremely realistic, very reasonable and logical.”

Virginia replies.

“There is a pattern there to be respected.”

Virginia continues.

“If you put the pattern into practice the pattern will continue and you will achieve your results.”

Karl replies.

“This framework is purely body-oriented.”

Karl continues.

“We believe that our body will feed a higher state of consciousness.”

Sally replies.

“What do we really mean by ‘mind’ though?”

Sally continues.

“What is the ‘body’?”

Virginia replies.

“The body consists of that which needs to be fed; the mind is that which needs to survey whether the body is fed properly.”

Karl replies.

“So needing to be fed is another part of the aggregate of the structure of mind.”

Karl continues.

“The whole problem we have from this perspective comes from our not having fed ourselves properly in the past, our not maintaining our health properly.”

Allen replies.

“This problem though, in terms of crazy wisdom, comes from our belief in the separateness of ‘I’ and ‘that’.”

Allen replies.

“I am separate from my food and my food is not me; therefore, I have to consume that particular food that is not me so that it can become part of me.”

Sally replies.

“The idea is that we have to create an object of worship and then eat the object of worship—chew it, swallow it.”

Sally continues.

“Once we have digested it, we believe ourselves to be whole.”

Karl replies.

“The fact that unless you do this you cannot be whole shows that this is still an act of separateness.”

Sally replies.

“Eating right seems to destroy the separateness, but fundamentally the separateness is still there.”

Karl replies.

“It is only a matter of time before you end up with the separateness again.”

Karl continues.

“Therein lies the problem with this approach.”

Caroline replies.

“Our sense of being whole is based on a physical act, of doing something—on what we eat.”

Sally replies.
“To become whole though, I have to give up the hope of becoming whole.”

Allen replies.

“In other words, in relation to ‘this’ exists and ‘that’ exists, I have to give up the hope that I can make my hope a reality.”

Sally replies.

“We give up hope.”

Allen replies.

“I don’t care if ‘that’ exists or ‘this’ exists; yes, I give up hope.”

“This hopelessness is the starting point of realization, of taking the goal as our path, of crazy wisdom, what we are about as dharma practitioners living in the West today.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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Crazy wisdom belongs neither to wickedness nor goodness…

Picture of Jamgon Kongtrul watching the 16th Karmapa empowering with gold leaf handprints the back of Vajradhatu’s Vajradhara thangka for Chogyam Trungpa the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Chogyam Trungpa’s collected works, as it pertains to crazy wisdom, in his own words…

Jonathan begins.

“To begin with, we have to let go certain fallacious notions connected with holiness, spirituality, goodness, heaven, godhood, and so forth.”

Allen replies.

“What makes these fallacious is the belief in a self, ego.”

Allen continues.

“That belief makes it so that ‘I’ am practicing goodness; thus, goodness is separated from ‘me’; or it implies some kind of a relationship in which goodness depends on ‘me’ and ‘me’ depends on goodness.”

Jonathan replies.

“Thus, fundamentally, since neither exists on its own], there is nothing there to build on at all.”

Allen replies.

“With this ego approach, a conclusion is drawn because of ‘other’ factors that prove that the conclusion is so.”

Virginia replies.

“According to the Buddhist outlook, ego, or self, is nonexistent.”

Virginia continues.

“It is not founded on any definite, real factors at all.”

Sally replies.

“It is based purely on the belief or assumption that since I call myself so-and-so, therefore I exist.”

Sally replies.

“And if I do not know what I am called, what my name is, then there is no structure there on which the whole thing is based.”

Allen replies.

“The way this primitive belief works is that believing in ‘that,’ the other, brings ‘this,’ the self.”

Allen pauses.

“If ‘that’ exists, then ‘this’ must also exist.”

Allen continues.

“I believe in ‘that’ because I need a reference point for my own existence, for ‘this’.”

Virginia replies.

“In the tantric, or vajrayana, approach my existence in relationship with others who exist is based on some energy, associated with how we live our lives.”

Sally replies.

“It is founded on some sense of understanding, which could also equally well be some sense of misunderstanding.”

Allen replies.

“When we ask ourselves, ‘Who are you, what are you?’ and we answer, ‘I am so-and-so,’ our affirmation or confirmation is based on putting something into that empty question.”

Jonathan replies.

“A question is like a container that we put something into to make it an appropriate and valid container.”

Virginia replies.

“There is some energy that is there between the two processes of giving birth to a question and producing an answer, an energy process that develops at the same time.”

Virginia continues.

“The energy that develops between the question and the answer is connected either with complete truth or complete falsehood.”

Sally replies.

“Strangely enough, those two do not contradict each other.”

Sally continues.

“Complete truth and complete falsehood are in some sense the same thing.”

Caroline replies.

“They make sense simultaneously.”

Caroline continues

“Truth is false, falsehood is true.”

Virginia replies.
“And that kind of energy, which goes on continuously, is called tantra.”

Virginia continues.

“And because it does not matter here about logical problems of truth or falsehood, the state of mind connected with
this is called crazy wisdom.”

Allen replies.

“Our minds are completely and constantly fixed on relating to things as either ‘yes’ or ‘no’; ‘yes’ in the sense of existence, ‘no’ in the sense of disproving that existence.”

Jonathan replies.

“Yet our framework of mind continues all the time between those two attitudes.”

Allen replies.

“‘Yes’ is based on exactly
the same sense of reference point as the negation is.”

Virginia replies.

“So the basic framework of mind involving a sense of reference point goes on continuously, which means that there is some energy constantly happening.”

Sally replies.

“What this means is that we do not have to negate the experience of our lives.”

Caroline replies.

“We do not have to negate our materialistic or spiritually materialistic experiences. ”

Sally replies.

“We do not have to negate them as being bad things; nor for that matter do we have to affirm them as being good things.”

Virginia replies.

“We can relate this to the simultaneous birth into existence of things as they are.”

Sally replies.

“Coemergence.”

Jonathan replies.

“Our negations or affirmations as to whether it belongs to ourselves or the others do not make any difference at all.”
Sally replies.

“All the time we are affirming or negating, we are standing on this ground anyway.”

Caroline replies.

“This ground we are standing on is the place of birth as well as the place of death, simultaneously.”

Virginia replies.

“We are talking about a particular energy that permits crazy wisdom to be transmitted.”

Jonathan replies.

“Crazy wisdom belongs neither to wickedness nor goodness; it belongs to neither yes nor no.”

Caroline replies.

“It is a principle that accommodates everything that exists in our life situations altogether.”

Allen replies.

“The birth of tantra takes place from this nonexistence of belief in ‘this’ and ‘that’.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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India maintains OTD’s 1999 “escape” narrative not plausible…

Picture of OTD the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players discuss the recent confirmation that the Indian Government continues to consider his presence a threat to its sovereignty and national security…

Jonathan begins.

“A reader dropped some knowledge on us this morning they would like us to discuss here.”

‘Centre has restricted his movement and he is not allowed to visit Rumtek monastry in Sikkim. Reportedly, central security agencies are not convinced about the circumstances in which he managed to escape from Chinese rule.’

From the Times of India February 1, 2016

Karl replies.

“From our crazy wisdom perspective here in America.”

Karl continues.

“None of us believe a 14 year old OTD made his 1999 escape from China happen as he maintains it went down.”

Allen replies.

“Out of respect for Rinpoche’s belief that OTD is the reincarnation of the 16th Karmapa I suspended my disbelief.”

Allen continues.

“In retrospect thoughthere is no denying that OTD’s presence in India serves China’s geopolitical interests in the region.”

Virginia replies.

“You say that like it is a bad thing.”

Allen replies.

“It is no concern of mine as far as my practice is concerned.”

Allen replies.

“Far be it for me to question what Rinpoche believes.”

Sally replies.

“From a crazy wisdom perspective we question everything though, as part of our process.”

Jonathan replies.

“Our approach is to appreciate appearances for what they are.”

Jonathan continues.

“We don’t take them personally.”

Virginia replies.

“OTD being born and raised in China, China’s choice for 17th Karmapa, is what it is for us, appearance-emptiness.”

Virginia continues.

“Thanks to our crazy wisdom approach to appearances we know better than to think otherwise though.”

Karl replies.

“We understand that it only appears to be a thing for us because we live in an America In which China is an issue for us as Americans.”

Virginia replies.

“China isn’t an issue for OTD personally.”

Virginia continues.

“There is no denying China has been good for OTD’s Karma Kagyu sect either.” 

Sally replies.

“So what?”

Allen replies.

“Exactly.”

Allen continues.

“This is no skin off my nose.”

Virginia continues.

“It’s only a problem for us if we take it personally, really, which none of us here do.”

Sally replies.

“At least that is where we are coming from as a sangha, from our Crazy Wisdom perspective, for what it’s worth.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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Chogyam Trungpa on transforming cynicism into Vajra pride…

Picture from 1978 of the 16th Karmapa at Rumtek the old man instagramed to illustrate this episode of Pulp Buddhism in which the Naropa Prairie Dog Players do a dramatic reading from volume five of Rinpoche’s collected works, in his own words…

Jonathan begins.

“By way of beginning, we adopt an attitude of distrust: distrust toward ourselves and also toward the teachings and the teacher—toward the whole situation in fact.”

Jonathan continues.

“We feel that everything should be taken with a grain of salt, that we have to examine and test
everything thoroughly to make sure it is as good as gold.”

Allen replies.

“In taking this approach, we have had to develop our sense of honesty—we have to cut through our own self-deceptions, which play an important part.”

Jonathan replies.

“We cannot establish spirituality without cutting through spiritual materialism.”

Jonathan continues.

“We prepare the basic ground with the help of this distrust.”

Virginia replies.

“Having developed accurate and vajra-like cynicism and having cultivated vajra nature, we begin to realize what spirituality is.”

Sally replies.

“And we find that spirituality is completely ordinary.”

Allen replies.

“It is completely ordinary ordinariness.”

Jonathan replies.

“Though we might speak of it as extraordinary, in fact it is the most ordinary thing of all.”

Caroline replies.

“To relate with this, we change our pattern.”

Caroline continues.

“The next step is to develop devotion and faith.”

Sally replies.

“We cut through deception completely and honestly, then a positive situation begins to develop.”

Sally continues.

“We gain a positive understanding of ourselves as well as of the teachings and the teacher.”

Allen replies.

“In order to work with this basic sanity, we have to develop a kind of suspension of disbelief.”

Jonathan replies.

“This is as equally important as the cynical approach we have been taking up till now.”

Allen replies.

“There are two types of this romantic, or bhakti,
approach.”

Caroline replies.

“One is based on a sense of poverty.”

Sally replies.

“You feel you don’t have it, but the others do.”

Virginia replies.

“You admire the richness of that: the goal, the guru, the teachings.”

Jonathan replies.

“This is a poverty approach—you feel that these other things are so beautiful because you don’t have what they have.”

Allen replies.

“It is a materialistic approach—that of spiritual materialism—and it is based on there not being
enough sanity in the first place, not enough sense of confidence and richness.”

Caroline replies.

“Our approach is based on the sense that you do have it; it is there already.”

Allen continues.

“You do not admire it because it is somebody else’s, because it is somewhere far away, distant from you, but because it is right here—in your heart.”

Sally replies.

“It is a sense of appreciation of what you are.”

Caroline replies.

“You have as much as the teacher has, and you are on the path of dharma yourself, so you do not have to look at the dharma from outside.”

Jonathan replies.

“This is a sane approach; it is fundamentally rich; there is no sense of poverty at all.”

Allen replies.

“This type of suspension of disbelief is important.”

Jonathan replies.

“It is the most powerful thing of all.”

Sally replies.

“It cuts through cynicism, which exists purely for its own sake, for the sake of its own protection.”

Allen replies.

“It cuts through cynicism’s ego game and develops further and greater pride—vajra pride, as it is called.”

Sally replies.

“There is a sense of beauty and even of love and light.”

Virginia replies.

“Without this, our practice is purely a matter of seeing how deep and profound we can get in our psychological experience.”

Sally replies.

“It remains a myth, something that you do not have; therefore it sounds interesting but never becomes personal.”

“Devotion or compassion is the only way of relating with the grace—the adhishthana, or blessing—of our lineage.”

Karl replies.

“It seems that many people find this cynical and skeptical style that we have developed too irritatingly cold.”

Karl continues.

“Particularly, people who
are having their first encounter with our scene say this.”

Virginia replies.

“There is no sense of invitation; people are constantly being scrutinized and looked down upon.”

Allen replies.

“Maybe that is a very honest way for you to relate with the other, which is also you.”

Allen continues.

“But at some point, some warmth has to develop in addition to the coldness.”

Jonathan replies.

“You do not exactly have to change the temperature—intense coldness is warmth—but there is a certain twist we could accomplish.”

Allen replies.

“It lies only in our conceptual mind and logic.”

Jonathan replies.

“In reality, there is no twist at all, but we have to have some way of putting this into words.”

Sally replies.

“What we are talking about is irritatingly warm and so powerful, so magnetizing.”

Jonathan replies.

“Our discussion here happened purely by accident, even though it involved a lot of organizing, working a lot of things out.”

Jonathan continues.

“But still it was worked out accidentally.

Sally replies.

“It is a very precious accident for us to have the opportunity to discuss such a topic.”

Virginia replies.

“The opportunity to discuss such a subject is very rare, unique, very precious.”

Sally replies.

“But such a rare and precious situation goes on constantly; our life as part of the teachings is extremely precious.”

Allen replies.

“Each of us came here purely by accident, and since it was an accident, it cannot be repeated.”

Sally replies.

“That is why it is precious.”

Caroline replies.

“That is why the dharma is precious.”

Allen replies.

“Everything becomes precious; human life becomes precious.”

Jonathan replies.

“There is this rare preciousness of our human life: we each have our brain, our sense perceptions, our materials to work on.”

Allen replies.

“We have each had our problems in the past: our depressions, our moments of insanity, our struggles—all these make sense.”

Caroline replies.

“So the journey goes on, the accident goes on—which is that we are here.”

Jonathan replies.

“This is the kind of romanticism, the kind of warmth we are talking about.”

Jonathan continues.

“It is worthwhile approaching the teaching in this way.”

End scene. Fini.

Another episode of Pulp Buddhism brought to you by the Naropa Prairie Dog Players and by viewers like you, thank you for your support.

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